4 Tips For Successfully Activating Your Brand By Integrating Mobile and Web.

May 7, 2013

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Many of the main issues marketers experience stem from what can only be called the “Separate Development Syndrome”. When different individuals or departments own different pieces of the activation program, it’s no wonder that the experience can feel disjointed to a consumer.

Tip Number One:

Where possible, try to avoid having two separate agencies or engineering teams (one Web, one mobile) developing two separate products but not working together on what should feel like the same experience. The focus should be on the consumer with the technology being the facilitator to delivering the optimum experience.

Tip Number Two:

This kind of disjointedness is not limited to engineering departments, or agencies. Quite often it is inherent in the structure of the marketing department itself when individuals or departments own different pieces. The mobile group may be responsible for the App or WAP site and the digital group the Web site and microsite strategy. If this is reflective of your structure, try to make sure that both teams work against the same brief, targeted experience deliverable and desired outcome or behavior.

Tip Number Three: 

Make sure that you have “mobile with a purpose” versus just to say that you have an App. I so often hear a client say that they need an App. When I ask why, the response amounts to not much more than it would be cool to have one. Quite often they do not even have a viable WAP site yet or what they do have is not cross-platform friendly.

Case Study Example: A recent client who is a large retailer focused on the tween and teen market, briefed us on developing a mobile App. When I asked the CMO via what devices do the current Million plus a month visitors access the current site, they did not know. On further research, we found that over 700,000 of them accessed it via a tablet or smartphone and believe it or not, the current site was not tablet or smartphone friendly. Hence our suggestion to develop a suitable WAP site in the first instance.

 Tip Number Four:

Start by taking an integrated approach with a problem-solving mindset. Start with two questions: “Does this make sense for our brand?” and “Does this enhance the consumer experience?” If you can answer yes to both of those questions, you are probably on the right track.

Digital, mobile and social technologies are the glue or even better the critical DNA to brand activation. That being the case, they must be strategically integrated, seamlessly developed and executed and add reciprocal value to the brand/consumer interaction and relationship.

 


Gatorade Puts Social Media At The Center Of Marketing

June 21, 2010

 

The company recently created the Gatorade Mission Control Center inside of its Chicago headquarters, a room that sits in the middle of the marketing department and could best be thought of as a war room for monitoring the brand in real-time across social media. (Source: Mashable.com)

 According to a recent blog post on Mashable.com this iconic mass marketer is taking social media marketing very seriously.  The goal of this project, says Carla Hassan, is to “take the largest sports brand in the world and turn it into largest participatory brand in the world.” To that end, the company’s not only monitoring its brand on social media, but giving its fans increased access to its athletes and scientists.

 In the realm of marketing, Gatorade is probably best known for splashy commercials featuring some of the world’s most famous athletes. However, a new effort behind the scenes of the sports drink maker is putting social media quite literally at the center of the way Gatorade approaches marketing. 

The company recently created the Gatorade Mission Control Center inside of its Chicago headquarters, a room that sits in the middle of the marketing department and could best be thought of as a war room for monitoring the brand in real-time across social media.

The room features six big monitors with five seats for Gatorade’s marketing team to track a number of data visualizations and dashboards (also available on to employees on their desktops). The company custom built this capability with partners that included Radian6 and IBM. Below are a few of the visualizations that Mashable.com featured in their blog post:

 This monitor is a visualization of tweets that are relevant to Gatorade; the company is tracking terms relating to its brand, including competitors, as well as its athletes and sports nutrition-related topics.

 This monitor measures blog conversations across a variety of topics and shows how hot those conversations are across the blogosphere. The company also runs detailed sentiment analysis around key topics and product and campaign launches.

Mission Control in Action 

While this certainly looks impressive visually, it’s also actually being used on a day-to-day basis, to lead product and marketing changes at the company that might not have happened without it.

Gatorade’s Sr. Marketing Director, Consumer & Shopper Engagement Carla Hassan offered a few examples, starting with the company’s monitoring of its “Gatorade has evolved” campaign. The commercials featured a song by rap artist David Banner, which, Mission Control quickly saw was being heavily discussed in social media. Within 24 hours, they had worked with Banner to put out a full-length version of the song and distribute it to Gatorade followers and fans on Twitter and Facebook, respectively.

On a day-to-day basis, the facility is also being used for more conventional marketing tactics like optimizing landing pages and making sure followers are being sent to the top performing pages. As an example, the company says it’s been able to increase engagement with its product education (mostly video) by 250% and reduce its exit rate from 25% to 9%.

What’s interesting to note is that this innovative approach to social media marketing is not being led by an agency, but more surprisingly by a large traditional mass media marketer. Is this just another missed leadership opportunity for the agency world? Given the significant up-front commitment required in terms of technology and people resources, would this not have been an ideal opportunity from a multi-client agency perspective?

Social media is no longer just a stand-alone communications channel that can exist and be managed in a silo environment. It underpins the way we all communicate with each other and with brands and the companies that own them. Marketers that understand this and embrace it the way Gatorade has will be able to maintain considerable competitive advantage. In fact to put it in their own words…“take the largest sports brand in the world and turn it into largest participatory brand in the world.”



If you are not winning over 60% of New Business Pitches – be prepared to change your approach, your team, you or all of the above!

June 1, 2010

According to the findings of the recent  Mirren/IMI Survey Report… It’s systemic! Either your company/self are excellent –good –or poor … If you don’t close 60% of new pitches or more change your approach, your team, your content, yourself! Every agency should have a minimum goal of 10+ key pitches per year with a 60%+ close rate.  (Source: 2010 Mirren Client/Agency Relationship Study)

 Survey results showed that the top 10% of agencies close 6 times as many new business pitches as compared to bottom 10%. Winning pitches range from 84%for the top 10% down to 16% for the bottom 10% with the average win rate being 43%.

What’s important to note is that performance is based on providing client solutions, experience and relationships that work , while number of pitches, types of pitches, investment in pitches, location of pitches HAS NO IMPACT.

 It is not about YOU -it is about your ability to deliver client solutions that meet or exceed their objectives.

 In 2010 and beyond Clients are buying solutions (i.e. ideas that work) for their business that are measurable –not awards, reputations, or promises. Lip service, credential pitches and talking about your agency to sell clients on what they need is over and ignored.

 Digital expertise is essential –but combining traditional/ non-traditional expertise to drive client solutions will drive your success.

 Be solution focused and media neutral –don’t just say it, do it!

 The move to digital has and will continue to happen, but caution, some of you are moving TOO FAST. According to the findings, clients don’t want you to dismiss traditional media/tactics/executions. Clients believe digital to be part of the strategy and not the total solution.

 Knowledge and expertise that demonstrates how, when and where to use social and mobile media’s is essential. Clients are looking for agencies that KNOW vs. agencies that GUESS.

 In addition, agencies that invest their own R&D $$$ on understanding, educating and providing thought leadership in digital/mobile/social medias, will leap frog other agencies. Those agencies expecting to cut their „digital teeth‟ on client’s budgets are destined to client churn and disappointment.

 

 

 


The Future Of The Online Customer Experience…Is Your Agency A Capable Partner?

May 4, 2010

 

To prepare for the future, customer experience professionals should develop multichannel personas, include social media behaviors in ethnographic research, prepare atomized content, establish an environment for testing new experiences, and seek out highly skilled interaction designers” Source: Forrester Research.

 Back in January of this year I read an article from Forrester authored by Moira Dorsey titled “The Future Of Online Customer Experience“ and it has remained top of my mind ever since. As I look at the plethora of agencies out there who all claim to be highly proficient at developing websites (and the associated customer experience), and contrast that with my actual experiences across a broad range of sites, I start to see a huge disconnect – especially when judged by the parameters described in the article!

 In her executive summary, the author gives out the following advice to marketers:

 “To prepare for the future, customer experience professionals should develop multichannel personas, include social media behaviors in ethnographic research, prepare atomized content, establish an environment for testing new experiences, and seek out highly skilled interaction designers.”

 I am not certain about your particular agency, however, I do not know of many who could deliver on the tenants listed above. What’s even more alarming is that many seem to be unaware that they need them in order to create highly engaging online customer experiences.

 After all, it’s not that hard to design a website and the optimum online experience, is it? The reality is that it’s no longer as simple as you might think:

 Information providers ranging from large companies to prolific individuals continue to flood the Internet with a tsunami of online information targeted at increasingly wired consumers. Proliferating Web sites vie for attention and in the last three years, the number of active sites has almost doubled. Literally tens of millions of additional sites divide consumer attention, making it less likely that any one site can both attract and retain mind share. So, what can we do to break through all this clutter?

 According to Forrester, there are four attributes that will define the next phase of online experiences

  • Customized by the end user. Consumers will not only control what they get online, they’ll control the form that they receive it in to a much greater degree than they do today.
  • Aggregated at the point of use. Content, function, and data will be pulled from different sources and combined at a common destination to create a unique experience.
  • Relevant to the moment. This customized, aggregated content will appear on the device that’s best suited to the customer’s context at a given point in time.
  • Social as a rule, not an exception. Social content will be integrated into most online experiences, not segregated into today’s blogs, micro blogs, and wikis.

 The article goes on to conclude that:

 Firms with poor online experiences today will fall further behind their competitors. People prefer rich online experiences — and their interest in new technologies indicates that they will love CARS experiences even more. That means the days of online experiences dominated by the page-and-PC-based paradigm are rapidly nearing their end. But even as online interaction capabilities grow, so too will the complexity of designing those experiences and the number of opportunities for mistakes that will frustrate customers. As a result, the gap between great and poor online experiences will become even more dramatic, and online customer experience leaders will gain even more of an edge over the competition. 

 Multi-touch-point evaluation and analytics will become must-haves. Measuring customer experience across multiple channels is still a major challenge for most firms. But consumers will increasingly use multiple apps, devices, and sites to complete a single goal — online and in conjunction with other channels. In response, customer experience professionals will create centralized groups to coordinate metrics and a common framework for measurement. And to make data integration manageable, they will focus on one channel pair at a time.

 I believe that for most agencies (even those digital icons within our industry) that this is a wakeup call and at very least food for thought. With the right approach, this could be an incredible opportunity for the agency world to regain that long lost position on top of the client value pyramid.


As Clients Focus On Outcomes Versus Outputs…ROI Is Top Concern!

April 27, 2010

Clients have never been more focused on getting a good return on their marketing investments. Anderson and MENG found that “marketing ROI” had jumped to become the most important trend to marketing executives. Social media also cracked the top 10 this year, although many are sick of hearing about it.

 

Historically, most agency reviews have been focused around reviewing agency outputs rather than the outcomes they produced. RFP documents included a plethora of questions about a broad range of agency capabilities but asked very little about the results those same campaigns produced.

Well, the game is changing and changing fast. An increasing number of the current RFI’s and RFP’s are including many more questions like the following:

“Please be sure to include results reporting actual numbers versus generic statements like; significantly exceeded target etc.” (If for confidentiality reasons you are not able to share actual numbers then please go ahead and index them)

 Clients are doing their homework and they want to know not only how creative and innovative your work is, but just as importantly how effective is it.

 This increased focus outcomes should not come as a surprise to agencies. A recent survey conducted by Anderson and Meng, found that “marketing ROI” had jumped to become the most important trend to marketing executives. Social media also cracked the top 10 this year, although many are sick of hearing about it. Interestingly Social ROI ranked in tenth place, reinforcing the importance of ROI overall.

 

This ROI focus has caused considerable angst for those agencies that do not bother to track results or alternatively are embarrassed to share disappointing performance or outcomes. The bottom line is that the situation is not going to get easier. In fact, I expect that it will not be long before most or all agency reviews will be significantly influenced by outcomes (results) versus outputs (The work alone).


Effectively leveraging Digital Channels to Drive Incremental Ad Agency New Business Leads!

April 7, 2010

Most ad agencies are not effectively leveraging digital channels to help drive incremental new business leads. Here are five simple steps you can implement immediately to increase your new business lead flows…

Optimize your website for SEO: Is your agency website full of flash and streaming video? Then it’s probably highly ineffective from an SEO perspective and you are probably invisible to many potential prospects conducting agency research online. Now there is new technology available that makes Flash SEO friendly. (WhittmanHart Interactive is currently at the leading edge of this technology) You now have two options to choose from. Either redesign your site with less flash or update your flash programming to be more SEO friendly.

Monitor your daily website traffic: You would be surprised how many agencies put up a website and then fail to track daily visitors to the site. Simple monitoring through Google analytics can provide you with some very useful leads. Take a look at who visited, how long they stayed, what they looked at etc. This is a very useful tool to monitor activity after a recent new business meeting, seminar presentation or capabilities presentation.

Develop and Implement an agency SEO/M strategy: When questioned on the subject, most agencies admit to not having one. Given that 100 percent of clients looking for an agency conduct online research during the process, it’s hard to imagine why this would be the case. A basic SEO/M strategy can be highly effective at generating interest and inquiries.

It’s time to become more social: A social media strategy is a must have in today’s conversation economy. If you are not involved in the conversation you are unlikely to become a consideration. And don’t think that by putting up a Facebook page, agency blog and by twittering that you have a social media strategy. You will need to implement a comprehensive approach that includes developing your content strategy and how you are going to build your following. It does not end there either…

Ongoing Social CRM: What really makes “social + CRM” work? Connecting customers/prospects, business processes, and employees. Social CRM involves multiple elements, linked together, to provide an end-to-end understanding of how your brand, product, or service is received in the marketplace and how your internal processes produce and deliver experiences that drive this reception. If you are going to reach out through social media you will need a Social CRM strategy to keep the conversation going and deliver the value exchange required to move your prospect along the sales funnel.  

   


Successful Ad Agency New Business Social Media Strategies

March 30, 2010

Just because you build it does not mean that they will come! Contrary to what you may believe, social media marketing may not turn out to be that fantastic “Field of Dreams” you were hoping for. With over 200,000,000 blogs already out there in the Blogosphere, just because you put up your new agency blog does not mean that your new business prospects will find it… Let alone read it.

 

Overnight success stories related to social media marketing are rare. Even more rare to find is an agency with an actual social media strategy. Last year my online agency survey (which included a diverse group of agencies) found that nearly two thirds of these agencies did not have a social media strategy!  

Putting up a blog, starting to Twitter and updating your Facebook page is quick and easy to do. Actually building a following/community is a totally different set of tasks and responsibilities that takes a lot of resources and time to do. Most agencies have no idea about the investment they will need to make to build an active following, beyond the nuts and bolts of getting it live on the Web.

One of the first considerations is to determine what your content strategy is going to be:

Content is still King and keep in mind that we are all creatures of habit. If there’s already an active community dedicated solely to what you are interested in communicating about, it’s likely you aren’t going to be able to move people from that community into your brand new “branded community.” In social media, people tend to avoid the loud “Here I am” type of marketing efforts in lieu of marketers who actually are interested in
building relationships with them in genuine ways.

Spend some time doing some buzz monitoring and take the time to really listen to what the data is telling you:

Try to understand how your different prospect segments consume content. One segment might like conversing on forums and message boards. Another segment might want more information, so a blog providing that information would be better suited for that segment . If you don’t dig into the
data, it’s tough to really know what your audience is looking for.

You have to actively build your following versus waiting for them to come to you:

This is an extremely important yet overlooked component of a successful social media strategy. You need to strategically integrate every tool and channel available in your arsenal to get the right people engaged. For example, consider content federation strategies if you happen to have a substantial amount worth sharing. Identify key influencers and follow those people who follow them as many will go ahead and follow you back. This can be a very effective strategy for building a large following quickly.

It all starts with a social media plan based on sound insights and leads to effective, sustainable engagement. You will know that you are successful when you are able to get YOUR prospects to share THEIR personal networks with you.  


Does Your Agency Have An Effective “Elevator Speech”?

March 23, 2010

Most agencies do not have a succinct “Elevator Speech” that effectively communicates both what they do and their unique value proposition. In fact, if you asked ten different people within the same agency, you are likely to get ten different answers! So how can we expect prospective clients to understand clearly who and what we are?

 

If you do not believe me, I challenge you to take a walk around your agency tomorrow and ask ten different staff members to explain in a simple statement what it is you do and what your value proposition is. I have done this recently on several different occasions and the result has been consistent. Complete inconsistency!

What has been consistent is the gratuitous use of super superlatives that just add to the noise and clutter and make our industry seem naive and commoditized. Common place are words and phrases like:

  • Full service integrated agency
  • Proprietary planning methodology/tool
  • Highly insightful creative
  • Award winning creative agency
  • Channel agnostic
  • Outside of the box thinkers
  • The industry’s leading….
  • Widely known throughout the industry for our…
  • Nationally recognized experts in …

The bottom line is that clients have heard all of these claims before many times. They also tell me that in their experience, no agency to date has ever delivered against their claims and the therefore their BS Meters are tuned way up. I recently heard a well known Search Consultant describe the situation as “Embarrassing”!

My advice is before you do any more new business prospecting that you sit down with your team and take a deep and considered look at how you position your agency. Try not to “drink the cool aid” as you do so. Be honest and ask yourselves the hard questions, such as:

  • What do we as agency really do well?
  • What is it about the way we do it that helps us do it well?
  • Is there anything unique about what or how we do it and what’s our value proposition from a client perspective? Why us and not any one of the 5000 other agencies out there claiming to do the same thing?
  • What proof do we have to support our claims versus just rhetoric?
  • What are the characteristics of our ideal target client? ( Partner vs. vendor etc)
  • What categories are we relevant to? (Not which do we aspire to)

These are just a few of the questions that every agency should answer in order to be successful at differentiating itself from the competition and winning new business. Every day I continue to be amazed at how many agencies out there have not taken the time to do so.


Successful Agencies Don’t Just Excel In One Particular Channel

March 15, 2010

According to Forrester Research…“There will be a reduction in the role of channel specialists. As marketers seek interactivity, agencies that subsist will forgo their role as channel specialists and dedicate themselves instead to determining how to change the relationship marketers have with their end customers”.    Source: Shar Van Boskirk, Forrester Research, Jan 12, 2010

 

Today’s successful marketers have realized that it isn’t good enough just to excel in one particular channel. Multichannel marketing companies absolutely need to spend as much time on their “old” channels as they do with their “new” ones. The biggest problem these marketers face, is finding agency partners that think the same way.

While the entire buzz right now is centered on subjects like making iPhone apps, Twitter strategies, Facebook and search marketing, the reality is, if the rest of your channel marketing sucks, then an iPhone app isn’t going to make a big difference. Likewise, if your in-store (or branch) experience is disappointing, that won’t make up for a lackluster online experience. The key to success is to spend some quality time looking not only at each of the channels individually, but more importantly, at how they intersect with each other to deliver the overall brand experience.

To help understand the philosophy, I would like to share a quote from Jack Aaronson from ClickZ.

“I’ll use a folklore tale of an architect. According to the story, an architect was hired to design a college campus. He put up the buildings but created no sidewalks. When the head of the school asked him where the sidewalks were, he replied, “The students will create the sidewalks.” Sure enough, a year later the architect visited the school and built paved sidewalks where the students had created well-worn paths in the grass”.

This implies a truly customer-centric (needs-based) design approach and we can all learn from this story as we create a methodology for modeling multichannel behavior. You’re most likely aware of how consumers act within a specific channel. You may know how to create the best brick-and-mortar experience, catalog, Web site, kiosk, call center, sales office, Web 2.0 widget, and the like. In the story of the architect, these channels are the buildings. They run fairly well on their own. But how do users move between them? What paths do they create? And, most important, how can we analyze the paths’ success and value?

The first step is to understand the paths people are taking between your buildings and why. Once you create the sidewalks that let them do this easily, everything else will follow suit. The technology exists to track these sidewalks, attribute value to them, and credit the channels appropriately.

Agencies that truly understand this philosophy and embrace it will become leaders at delivering the consummate “Customer Engagement Experience” and assume their rightful place at the head of the client’s agency roster.


Six Agency Search Questions Clients Ask…How You Answer Will Determine Your Success!

February 25, 2010

These six questions consistently come up in most agency search RFI’s. Your answers to them play a critical role in the decision as to whether you move forward in the process or are eliminated at this early stage. Take the time now to develop considered points of view rather than a rushed “in the moment” response.

 

What are the exclusive or unique services and capabilities that give your agency a competitive advantage in the marketplace?

 While the actual wording may differ, the question is almost always included in most agency RFI’s. Clients want to know exactly what it is that makes your agency different. What value does your agency bring to the relationship and how will what you offer help them compete more effectively and win. It’s not about a laundry list of capabilities – as every agency claims to have every capability. My suggestion is that you take the time to ask yourselves not only what you do well, but also what it is about what you do that makes you measurably better than the competition. Remember that you cannot be all things to everyone.

Describe the top three trends in the industry as you see it and how is your agency leading and reacting to these trends?

 Clients want to know that the agency they select is a leader and not a follower. They want to make sure that it is at least constantly keeping abreast of current trends if not predicting what the next one will be. In addition, clients are interested in knowing how you are leveraging them to give your clients competitive advantage. Depending on the RFP and your type of agency, the question can vary from broader consumer trends to specific category or vertical developments. 

Why do you provide better thought leadership than your competitors? 

This is just another question aimed at helping the client determine whether your agency is a leader or a follower. This question probes areas like strategic thinking, use of technology, innovative media and communications planning and data analytics etc. Once again they are trying determine what your value proposition is and how do you keep current.

How do you help your clients manage their brand and the total consumer experience in the digital space?

The buzz surrounding brand and customer experience continues to grow exponentially. Lead by Forrester Research, there has recently been a plethora of articles on “customer engagement agencies”. In fact, Forrester was even planning to publish a wave focused on  “customer engagement agencies” in the first quarter of 2010, however I am led to believe that this has been put on hold due to a lack of agencies who meet the basic selection criteria. You can be certain that this question is going to become ubiquitous in the near future so I would suggest that your agency develops not only a point of view, but also a track record of delivering it on behalf of your clients.

How have you used social media to generate business results? How did you measure ROI?

I would be very surprised if your agency has not already had this question thrown at you. Currently this seems to be the question that is on the tip of every clients tongue. It’s probably one of the most difficult questions to answer. I am certain that there are more agencies than not who cannot truly answer this question based on their own experience. I recommend that if you fall into this category that you at least develop a POV and approach that you can share. This will demonstrate to the client that you have given it serious thought and have a strategic approach to answering the million-dollar question.

Explain how you test, measure and optimize results for your clients?

This question is top of mind for most if not every client out there. There has never been in the history of marketing and advertising, a stronger focus on effectiveness, tracking, measurement and ultimately results. ROI is the subject d’ jour with many clients even asking agencies for some type of guarantee or at minimum shared risk participation. Some of the larger companies have moved all of their agency compensation models to a pay for performance model. Take the time to document your philosophy, approach, process, tools and tracking capabilities.


Agencies Slow to Harness Social Media For New Business Prospecting

November 23, 2009

According to a recent article written by Andrew McMains of Adweek, most agencies have a presence on social media sites such as Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook, but infrequently use them to market themselves or pursue client prospects, notwithstanding the fact that the more traditional approaches are not working.

A recent survey from RSW/US and Second Wind, found that nearly three-quarters of the 212 agency leaders polled in the online survey are connected to LinkedIn, 66 percent to Facebook and 56 percent to Twitter. But when asked how frequently they use each, the majority said no more than once a month. For example, 47 percent conceded that they never tweet, 7 percent said they tweet less than once a month and 4 percent tweet just once monthly.

The findings were similar for blogs, with 56 percent of the respondents saying that their agencies have blogs, but only 6 percent use them daily. A whopping 66 percent indicated that they blog no more than once a month.
And while 58 percent of the agency leaders pointed to LinkedIn as the social media tool they employ most often in account prospecting, only 4 percent use any type of social media “often” in this context, compared to 22 percent who “never” do.

The survey, which was conducted last month, provides yet another illustration of agencies not practicing what they preach to clients for the marketing of their brands.  This  “cobbler’s son” syndrome is also evident in everything from Flash-heavy, information-poor agency Web sites to shops neglecting to buy sponsored links to their names on Google.

Interesatingly, these findings are consistent with the online survey I conducted in July of this year.

Nearly two thirds of agencies said that they do not have a documented and active social media strategy. This confirmed just how poorly prepared agencies are from a digital perspective.  While most are actively out in the market trying to convince clients that they are indeed social media experts, they themselves have not embraced it as a critical component of their own marketing communications mix. Notwithstanding the fact that the more traditional approaches are not working.

On a side note, even more surprising was the fact that of the agencies who responded, well over half admitted to not having a documented and active SEO/M strategy. A receipe for disaster when you consider that in a recent survey of C-Suite executives, 74% of the respondents rated the internet as a very important source of business information and the fact that 100% of clients researched online 100% of the agencies that it intended to invite to a pitch.  Search engine marketing is a fundamental component of internet marketing and even today, still garners the bulk of a clients interactive marketing dollars. Many ad agencies are missing a critical part of the communications puzzle in this instance.  

It has never been more important for agencies to introduce innovation into their agency marketing initiatives. Building a following, creating dialog and listening to customers through social media techniques, are crucial to ongoing agency success.

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Effective Ad Agency New Business Prospecting In A Conversation Economy

November 10, 2009

 

conversation economy images

The new era of social networking has created what has been described as a “conversation economy”. Agency new business professionals need to change from trying to sell agency capabilities and start marketing conversations. To do this effectively your agency needs a conversation strategy.

Marketers are starved for time and already engaged in many and varied conversations. With over 200,000,000 blogs out there, jump-starting new and meaningful conversations with targeted prospective clients is the big challenge for agencies today. Just building a website, writing a blog, being on Twitter or posting videos on YouTube, doesn’t mean sufficient prospects will find you organically, much less take the time and energy to converse with you.

Having the right conversation strategy addresses two key issues: What meaningful content will attract sufficient conversations with the right people? And, how will you jump-start conversations and keep them alive?

According to Marsha Lindsay, the CEO of Lindsay, Stone & Briggs:  “Even if people know there’s an opportunity to have a conversation with you on Twitter or your blog for instance, you can’t expect them to engage given all the other demands on their time. You’ll need a strategy that both gets them to know you exist and care so much that you exist, they’ll become intrigued about conversing with you. This requires a strategy that integrates search optimization, media, message and contributions of content from the marketers themselves”.

“The right strategy begins with the end in mind: What message can work across multiple platforms and be scaled so quickly and broadly it can drive sufficient interactions to support your business model?”

A multimedia mix framed to spark conversations requires a compelling message concept that can work across a multimedia platform. Its foundation has to be far more than a one-time new business outreach; it must be a message strategy that connects the agency’s brand meaning with search habits and accommodates ongoing contributions that can range from casual conversations to marketer-generated content.

This is a tall order, but not impossible. That’s because the solution can be found in the motivations of the conversationalists themselves. After all, conversation is mankind’s natural search engine.

The question then becomes – how do you keep the conversation going? You’ll constantly be competing with other conversations for your target’s time and attention. So, spark and fuel conversations with surveys, forums and invitations for contributions that pertain to the incremental value that your agency can bring to their brand/product. Keeping ongoing conversations fresh is where contextual research and newsletters, blogs, websites, videos and social media shine.

For those agencies who get their conversation strategy right, marketers will take over the conversation for you, making your new business development more efficient, and making you a genius in your new role as chief conversation officer.


Coca Cola’s Carol Kruse Shares Her Perspectives About Their Interactive Marketing Experiences.

October 27, 2009

Carol KruseCoke

 

 

 

 

 

 

Every marketer and agency alike are asking the same question right now. How effective are these new media channels and how can we measure that effectiveness and the associated ROI? Carol’s perspective is quite simply – “If you are going to shift money from one pot to the other, you certainly want to make sure it’s going to be equally effective.”

In a recently published interview with Carol Kruse on eMarketer Carol shared some great insights that can be effectively leveraged by agencies looking for new business opportunities:

“I think before you have ROI you have to really understand how social media is driving your business”

Traditional sales funnel types of companies find it easier to directly attribute incremental sales to each initiative. However, for companies like Coke, she suggests focusing on measuring the business value of the different types of media/channels. Coke considers aspects like brand health or brand love and its affect on overall purchase intent.

“Measurement around mobile is difficult right now, and social media measurement is even more difficult.”

There are currently lots of engagement metrics like how many participated, time spent etc. Coke is looking to take those metrics to the next level, which for them is all about driving brand value. It’s about bringing incremental increases in brand love, purchase intent and actual purchase. Carol pints out that there is not one pat answer of what they are looking to measure because it depends on the brand and the business objectives.

“You have to be careful how you go about the measurement because you might undo all the goodwill you have built.”

Carol points out that while measurement is important, for mobile and social media marketing you have to do it in a way that is acceptable to consumers. The last thing you want to do is disrupt the consumer experience, when your overall objective is to enhance it.

The final question posed to Carol was – “What do you see as the most pressing issue for digital marketing?” Her response was that search marketing is underutilized by both packaged goods and other brand companies, and that search should not be relegated to direct marketers.


Social CRM Is The New Driver For Ad Agency New Business!

October 22, 2009

Social CRM is the new currency in ad agency new business. Influential clients are forcing a convergence between CRM and PR, making tracking what is being said and by who a vital component of your new business strategy.

In a recent survey conducted by Russell Herder and Ethos Business Law, marketers were asked the question, “For what reason do you use social media”. While 82% of respondents said that brand building was there number one reason, 60% indicated that personal networking was the second most important reason, with customer service a distant third at 32%.

 Social graph

The very marketers that we agencies target are telling us that personal social networking is an extremely important activity for them. Why then do so many agencies ignore social networking when it comes to their own new business prospecting?

Ad agencies should be out there listening to marketers, using the available tools to track all relevant conversations, identifying who the influencers are and starting to build a dialog and ultimately a relationship development program. Many prospective and existing agency clients are active right now sharing their opinions with others through social networking channels. Some of the more enthusiastic individuals have become evangelists, establishing a significant sphere of influence in the market place. Barry Judge, the CMO of Best Buy would be a perfect example of such a marketer.

According to Susan Scrupski of ITSinsider, seeing results depends heavily on how you organize your business and equip the people who are part of it. As you enable the conversation between you and your prospective customers, you enter into collaborative design. Picking up information and passing it into an organization that knows what to do with it is the inflection point between social business strategy and actual business success. Taking the time to measure it in the fundamental currency of business — which as Susan says is “currency” — is the final step in putting all pieces in place to win in the marketplace.

This convergence between PrR and CRM makes tracking who is saying what and developing an ability to respond directly a must have skill. By efficiently organizing and strategizing your responses, you can use this information to guide your social web program and the evolution of your business itself.

That’s powerful!

 

 

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Rx for Ad Agencies Suffering From Direct, Digital and Social Media Confusion or Disorientation

October 18, 2009

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The opportunity is clear. Forget about continuing to structure your agency in silos like brand, direct, digital and social marketing, and start to think about People2People marketing. qIf you can integrate your marketing efforts and succeed in motivating customers not only to interact with you, but to share their personal networks with you, you will have created a powerful channel for your brand in the marketplace.